Something that has often intrigued me is how intellectual properties branch out into our formats. This is especially true of RPGs. Books, movies, and art are examples of how the hobby has left its roots as a game. The book aspect of it is pretty interesting, because there is a ton of fiction dedicated to games. Some D&D novels just refuse to die, and let’s be honest, it’s not like they’re great literature. Yet, like all other forms of art, they inspire the readers.

I fully admit to having a collection of D&D novels. I haven’t read them in a while, but I have a special place in my heart for the old Ravenloft series of books. I can very clearly remember how stunned I was to read the dark fantasy/horror take on the game I loved. It blew my teenage mind, because it was the first time I’d read horror that resonated with me.

And that’s why this stuff won’t die. It matters to the readers. It’s nice, sure, but it means something special to the people who enjoy it. You could say this about just about anything, but with the games, having that immersive experience brought to life in different ways is cool. I mean, you all sit around and talk about it at the table while throwing dice.

Having the stories, or the art, or the movies is a way to bring the tales to life in completely different ways. I love how the games can inspire people, and I often look forward to reading gaming novels. If you’ve never tried one, well, head on down to library. They probably have a few.

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